Recently, a ” major-daily” columnist in Toronto ran a pro-life article that resulted in large volume of supportive mail as well as considerable flak from the paper’s feminist and pro-abortion faction.

When letters of support and of thanks began to arrive in response to the column (there were more in support than against), he approached the editor and suggested that a representative number be printed as “letters to the editor.”

The editor refused to print any on the grounds that they were addressed to the columnist privately and were not precisely “letters to the editor.” Readers of The Interim may want to keep such fine distinctions in mind the next time they write in support or censure of a writer.

Perhaps when supporting a writer or columnist one should write a “letter to the editor” and send it c/o the columnist: that way it will serve both purposes. But if one’s object is to disagree with or to censure a writer, maybe it should be managed the other way round. That is, write the “letter to the editor,” and send it to “the editor,” and send a copy to the writer or columnist.

On the other hand, writing a letter to Doris Anderson of the Toronto Star (her call for letters is above) may need a different approach. Ms. Anderson is requesting letters personally. As she is unsympathetic to pro-life, sending her a “letter to the editor” might serve as an excuse to ignore the writers views. In such case, one could write directly to Ms. Anderson and ( if you have the time) write a separate letter ” to the editor” might serve as an excuse to ignore the writer’s views. In such a case, one could write directly to Ms. Anderson and (if you have the time) write a separate letter “to the editor.”

When writing letters of protest, it is useful to keep these points in mind.

  • Limit them to one topic
  • Keep them brief-one page if possible.
  • Write legibly, or type
  • Be firm, reasonable, factual and courteous.
  • Avoid exaggeration and name calling

Sign with your name and postal address do not lend credence to the pro-abortionists’ myth that pro-lifers use false names and addresses.